Push Hands basics – cut me some slack


Push Hands basics – cut me some slack
Part of basic push hands training is understanding your functional range of movement. Where is the body strong and at what point in the turning of a joint does the power start to diminish. ? The following example has me discussing where there should be movement and where there should be stillness within the exercise. The Crownpoint is always held still so when the opponent goes to pull my arm he’s actually trying to pull my Crownpoint. When my Crown point is suspended and my opponent pulls my arm , it is important that I let him have some slack in my arm. If I hold my arm with resistance , it just shortens his connection and makes his power arrive on my body even sooner. It is important that I pay attention to what parts need to be slackened and when . When my arm is pulled, I simply release my Kuas ( inguinal crease) and allow my body to rotate 45° while suspended from the Crown Point . This example has me breaking up some of the neutralization’s into separate pieces to illustrate better the neutralization of power. When I let my arm slacken , then his pull will fall on nothing and he will start to Defect his own posture. Then I allow the torso to rotate 45° , this eats up additional power of his while defecting his posture even more. Any additional pulling that he does maybe neutralized by sinking into My foot. When my head is suspended from the Crown Point and he pulls like this, he stretches my spine away from my crown point and compresses my foot into the ground creating JIN for me passively .While he is still gripping and tightening his grip (as he has hit a wall ) I press the foot and turn back which captures him like a fish on a line. It is extremely important to suspend the Crown Point or none of these skills will be applicable. Do not look down past 45° and do not turn your body past 45° relative to your opponent and you will be in your safe zone. Any attempt to pull you out of the safe zone simply loads your Jin using the opponents strength to do so. It is extremely important that you do not pause between the pull down and the reversal or you will get caught. You have to feel when your opponent has compressed your foot and release the Jin at that point. He will be starting to tighten his grip as he ” hits the wall ” and will be caught like a fish on a line. At that point you may wrap his arm with your embracing palm ( connecting to the second or middle fist measurement of his forearm) and turn him. He is now in a very dis-advantageous position…

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